Insight Report: Business Strategies for Targeting HNWIs and UHNWIs in the Middle East

The wealth management sector in the Middle East is dynamic and complex, with significant growth in regionally made millionaires and billionaires, and wealthy expatriates. The HNWI population in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) market grew at a CAGR of 8.08% from 136,195 in 2010 to 185,816 in 2014, and is projected to grow by a CAGR of 4.1% between 2015 and 2019.

Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs’ complex needs, family values, and cultural differences brought by wealthy expatriates have become attractive to international private banks and domestic wealth management firms, leading to the development of sophisticated products and services. The UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar are the four main countries in the Gulf region where international private banks have expanded their operations and partnered with local firms.

Nevertheless, both types of provider are competing with each other to gain market share through product differentiation, and by building robust strategies to target Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs, and wealthy expatriates. It is therefore becoming increasingly important for international and domestic wealth managers and private banks to be aware of the latest market trends and also understand Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs' complex needs.

Scope

The report covers the following areas:

• Attitudes of wealth mangers and private banks to targeting Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs

• A snapshot of the Middle Eastern HNWI and UHNWI markets, including market size, key forecast markets trends, drivers and barriers in the wealthy Middle Eastern market, and key regulatory issues

• Coverage of the markets in the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman and Bahrain

• Key financial product and service offerings in the Middle East, and the role of family offices in managing the wealth of Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs

Key Highlights

• The HNWI population in the GCC market grew at a CAGR of 8.08% from 136,195 in 2010 to 185,816 in 2014, and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 4.1% over the forecast period.

• While the UHNWI market is smaller, it projected to grow at a similar CAGR of 4.57% from 2015 to 2019.

• Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs prefer to invest in property, bonds and private equity.

• Partnering with luxury brand is a new strategy for international private banks to gain market share in the Middle East.

• A market gap in Sharia-compliant products offers opportunities for wealth management service providers.

Reasons to buy

• Understand the complex needs of Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs, and know how best to target them.

• Make robust decisions in key areas such as expansion, client and marketing strategy to target Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs more effectively.

• Be informed about key market trends in financial product and service offerings in the GCC countries, and address each trend accordingly.

• Be aware of the attitudes of wealth managers and private bankers to the outlook for business strategies to target Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs.

Companies mentioned

HSBC Private Bank, HSBC Islamic Investment Bank, HSBC Saudi Arabia, Union National Bank, National Bank of Abu Dhabi, Emirates NBD PJSC, Emirates Islamic Bank, Noor Islamic Bank, Ajman Bank, Riyadh Bank, Itqan Capital, Banque Saudi Fransi, Bank AlJazeera, Al Rajhi Bank, The National Commercial Bank, Rasameel Structured Finance Company KSC, Investment Dar Co., Gulf Investment houseGlobal Investment House, Qinvest, Qatar National Bank, Qatar First Bank, Masraf Al Rayan, Commercial Bank of Qatar, Barwa bank, Oman Arab Bank, Bank Dhofar, Ahli United Bank, Al Salam Bank, Bahrein Islamic Bank, Bank Alkhair, Elaf Islamic Bank, Ithmaar Bank, The Lifschultz Organization, Al Mirqab Capital SPC, Mayhoola for Investments SPC, The Family Office Co., Qatar Investment & Projects Development Holding Co., WLL, The Capital Partnership Group Ltd, Novaar Capital Management, Al Touq Family Office, European Islamic Investment Bank (EIIB), deVere Group, Rasmala Holdings, Acuma, EFG Hermes Holdings Company, Qatar Islamic Bank, Ithmar Bank, Samba Financial Group, Kuwait Finance House, Dubai Islamic Bank, Standard Chartered Saadiq, Bank Sarasin-Alpen, Citi Islamic Investment Bank, HSBC Bank, UBS, Barclays, Citi Islamic Investment Bank, Coutts Private Bank, UBS, TD Direct investing, Hargreaves Lansdown, Credit Suisse, Lloyds banking Group, Royal bank of Scotland, Bank of London and the Middle East, European Islamic Investment Bank, Habib Bank, HSBC Islamic Investment Bank, Goldman Sachs, Saudi British Bank, Boubyan Bank

Table of Contents

1 Introduction

1.1 What is this Report About?

1.2 Definitions and Scope

2 Executive Summary

3 Attitudes of Wealth Managers and Private Banks to Targeting Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs

4 Snapshot of the Middle Eastern HNWI and UHNWI Markets

4.1 A Comparison of Business Strategies for Targeting HNWIs and UHNWIs in the Middle East

4.2 The Gulf’s HNWIs and UHNWIs Market Size and Key Market Trends

4.3 HNWI and UHNWI Demographic Trends

4.4 Drivers and Barriers of the HNWI and UHNWI Markets

4.4.1 Drivers

4.4.2 Barriers

4.5 Key Regulatory Issues

5 Middle East Markets: the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain

5.1 Financial Products and Services Offerings

5.1.1 The UAE

5.1.2 Saudi Arabia

5.1.3 Kuwait

5.1.4 Qatar

5.1.5 Oman

5.1.6 Bahrain

5.2 The Role of Family Office: Managing Wealth of HNWIs and UHNWIs

5.3 Business Strategies for Targeting HNWIs and UHNWIs

5.3.1 Expansion strategy

5.3.2 Client strategy

5.3.3 Marketing strategy

6 About WealthInsight

List of Tables

Table 1: HNWI Wealth Band and Group Definitions

Table 2: Needs of Middle Eastern UHNWIs in Private Banking and Wealth Management

Table 3: Preference of Middle Eastern and African HNWIs in Philanthropic Activities by Cause (%), 2013

Table 4: Competitive Benchmarking for the Wealth Management Sector in Key Middle Eastern Markets

Table 5: Key Parameters for the Wealth Management Sector in GCC Markets

Table 6: Overview of Strategies to Target HNWIs in the Middle East

Table 7: HNWI Populations in the Middle East, 2010–2019

Table 8: HNWI Wealth in the Middle East (US$ Billion), 2010–2019

Table 9: UHNWI Market Size in the Middle East, 2010–2019

Table 10: UHNWI Wealth in the Middle East (US$ Billion), 2010–2019

Table 11:Top 10 HNWI Families in the Middle East by Wealth (US$ Billion), 2014

Table 12: Business Formation Options for International Financial Services Operators

Table 13: Domestic Banks in UAE and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 14: Domestic Banks in Saudi Arabia and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 15: Domestic Banks in Kuwait and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 16: Domestic banks in Qatar and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 17: Domestic banks in Oman and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 18: Domestic banks in Bahrain and their Main Product and Service Offerings

Table 19: Family Offices in the Middle East

Table 20: Major Acquisitions in the Middle East, 2012–2014

Table 21: Key Domestic Islamic Banks in the Middle East

Table 22: Examples of International Banks Adopting Islamic Principles

Table 23: Wealth Management Services for Family Businesses in the Middle East

Table 24: Internet Users in the Middle East, 2014

List of Figures

Figure 1: HNWI and UHNWI Populations, 2014

Figure 2: HNWI Populations by Age Group, 2014

Figure 3:HNWI Population by Gender, 2014

Figure 4: HNWI Populations by Primary Source of Wealth (%), 2014

Figure 5: HNWI Populations by Industry Concentration (%), 2014

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