Quantum Computing – Thematic Research

Theoretically, quantum computing can complete in seconds tasks that would take classical computers thousands or even millions of years. Quantum computers are machines that use the properties of quantum physics to store data and perform computations. Use cases stretch from improved weather forecasting to cracking the codes used to encrypt all internet messaging. The company (or government) that owns the first at-scale quantum computer will be powerful indeed.

Quantum computers are proving extremely difficult to build, and fully-fledged commercial computers are not expected for 10, 20, or even 30 years. However, within the next five to seven years, intermediate quantum computers are likely to become available that can offer a quantum advantage over classical computers in certain optimization applications across, for example, space warfare, logistics, drug discovery, and options trading. These intermediate devices will become more powerful and robust with successive generations.

There are three risks facing the quantum computing industry: the extreme difficulty of engineering quantum devices that can entangle large numbers of qubits to cohere long enough to complete calculations; the shortage of people who combine data science and coding skills with a deep understanding of quantum physics; and the danger that hype and unmet expectations will lead to a quantum winter.

Head of Thematic Research, Cyrus Mewawalla, comments: “Comparisons are often drawn between quantum computing and nuclear fusion. Both are seen as technologies that are always 20 years away. Yet, as investments and collaborations demonstrate, companies do see quantum computing delivering value this decade and want to position themselves to take advantage of this. Quantum computing will be a game-changer.”

Scope

This report provides an overview of the quantum computing theme.

It identifies the key trends impacting growth of the theme over the next 12 to 24 months, split into two categories: technology trends and macroeconomic trends.

It includes a comprehensive technology briefing, which explains what quantum computers are, how they work, and why they are superior to classical computers.

The detailed value chain comprises five segments: quantum infrastructure, quantum hardware platform, quantum software, quantum applications, and quantum services.

Key Highlights

JP Morgan, Volkswagen, and Lockheed Martin are already working closely with the leading quantum computing companies, IBM, Google, Honeywell, and D-Wave, to develop skillsets in readiness for the quantum age with a stepping stone approach. The sector leaders are all creating Quantum-as-a-Service (QaaS) offerings on specialist cloud-based platforms, where prospective customers can experiment with quantum devices and start developing quantum code.

Reasons to buy

Within the next five to seven years, intermediate quantum computers are likely to become available that can offer a quantum advantage over classical computers in certain optimization applications across, for example, space warfare, logistics, drug discovery, and options trading. This report will help you understand what quantum computing is and its potential impact across industries. It also includes details of the companies leading the charge towards quantum supremacy.

Companies mentioned

Coax

ColdQuanta

Anyon Sytems

Blue Fors

Oxford Instruments

Montana instruments

Rigetti

Intel

Honeywell

AegiQ

NKT Photonics

Coherent

ColdQuanta

M Squared Lasers

Qnami

Siemens

Sumitomo Electric

Oxford Instruments

Zurich Instruments

ETL Systems

ColdQuanta

Delft Circuits

Zurich Instruments

ETL Systems

NuQuantum

Shafter-Kirchoff

Shanghai Optics

NuCrypt

GEM Systems

NTT

Supercon

SuNAM

Acroscape

Stirling Cryogenics

WEKA

Cryogenic Limited

ColdQuanta

Cosmic Microwave

Low Noise Factory

Sparrow Quantum

Quandela

Qontrol Systems

AOSense

Radix

GWR Instruments

AMSC

Bruker

Furukawa

CryoCoax

Temati

Chart Industries

Oxford Instruments

Montana instruments

RF Com

Photonic

Orca

Tundra

Apogee Instruments

Miraex

Single Quantum

Google

Microsoft

IBM

Honeywell

PsiQuantum

Alibaba

Rigetti

Intel

IonQ

Quantum Brilliance

D-Wave

Nokia

Riverlane

StrangeWorks

Xanadu

Baidu

ETH Zurich

Cambridge Quantum Computing

1QBit

QxBranch

Zapata

PQBranch

Q-CTRL

Accenture

Amazon

Qubitekk

StrangeWorks

QC Ware

QuTech

EY

McKinsey

Raytheon

Northrup Grumman

NEC

Oxford Quantum

Delft Circuits

Atos

Infineon

Universal Quantun

Quantum Machines

Thales

Fraunhofer

Archer Materials

Quantum Diamond Technologies

NTT Laboratories

AegiQ

HP

Qontrol Systems

Tundra Systems

Nu Quantum

Quandela

VeriQloud

Airbus

Aliro Quantum

AmberFlux

Pine.ly

Elyah

AppliedQubit

QBitLogic

Goldman Sachs

VolksWagen

JP Morgan

Dubai Electricity and Wateer Authority

Roche

Daimler

Nippon Steel

Jij

QpAI

Qindom

Rahko

PQShield

AT&T

Sixscape

Toptica Photonics

Brilliant

FutureLearn

Qubitekk

qutools

Perimeter Institute

BraneCell

QuantumCTek

Booz Allen

Boston Consulting Group

PA Consulting

h-bar

Mphasis

aquantum

ID Quantique

MagiQ Technologies

QuintessenceLabs

SeQureNet

In-Q-Tel

Fidelity

Table of Contents

Executive summary

Players

Technology briefing

Trends

Industry analysis

Value chain

Companies

Sector scorecard

Glossary

Further reading

Thematic methodology

    Pricing

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